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The end of this current plein air season will mark the 25th year that I've been offering private, ongoing plein air workshops in the Greater Seattle Area. 

Not many people today realize that in 1995 I initiated the first plein air classes at what is now called The Gage Academy, but was then called the Academy of Realist Art. I had been teaching there for at least a year prior to this, at which time I tried to introduce sight-size and other 19th century derived academic practices. This was met with much resistance. In 1997 I parted company with the academy, and at the request of my students, spearheaded by artist Sue Perry, I began teaching the plein air classes independently.

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The end of this current plein air season will mark the 25th year that I've been offering private, ongoing plein air workshops in the Greater Seattle Area. 

Not many people today realize that in 1995 I initiated the first plein air classes at what is now called The Gage Academy, but was then called the Academy of Realist Art. I had been teaching there for at least a year prior to this, at which time I tried to introduce sight-size and other 19th century derived academic practices. This was met with much resistance. In 1997 I parted company with the academy, and at the request of my students, spearheaded by artist Sue Perry, I began teaching the plein air classes independently.

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  • POPPIES, oil on canvas, 14 x 10 inches, copyright ©2010

In the late 1990s I was offering plein air classes privately, after piloting a 1995 program through the Gage Academy, which was then called the Academy of Realist Art. I had gone through a succession of monitors, those student participants that helped the class run smoothly in exchange for a tuition waiver, eventually working with Ako Lindley, a Tokyo born and bred Japanese woman who had made the U. S. her home for many decades. Ako was well connected in Seattle's Japanese community, and during her tenure as monitor she induced several other Japanese to join the class. One of these was Ritsuko Taneda.

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In the late 1990s I was offering plein air classes privately, after piloting a 1995 program through the Gage Academy, which was then called the Academy of Realist Art. I had gone through a succession of monitors, those student participants that helped the class run smoothly in exchange for a tuition waiver, eventually working with Ako Lindley, a Tokyo born and bred Japanese woman who had made the U. S. her home for many decades. Ako was well connected in Seattle's Japanese community, and during her tenure as monitor she induced several other Japanese to join the class. One of these was Ritsuko Taneda.

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We returned to Snohomish Valley viewpoint for a morning session, starting at 7am, ending at 11am. The site was beautiful, faint mist at first, burning off around 10.

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We returned to Snohomish Valley viewpoint for a morning session, starting at 7am, ending at 11am. The site was beautiful, faint mist at first, burning off around 10.

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